WARS:....mHaabhaart WAR OF 5100 YEARS TO UPHOLD & MAINTAIN DHARm & HARMONIOUS CO-EXISTENCE STILL CONTINUES TODAY...???!!!!!!
Posted by Champaklal Dajibhai Mistry on May 11, 2005

 

 

 

 

PHOTOS: LEFT: A dense column of smoke rises over Nagasaki, Japan, after the second atomic bomb was dropped by the U.S. CENTRE: The defendants' dock is shown here during the post-war trials for war criminals in Nuremberg, Germany. RIGHT: 50 million  who believed in DHARm paid with their lives with and without any freedom of choice...

MAY 8, 2005 IS THE 6OTH ANNIVERSARY OF
 V-E DAY = THE UNCONDITIONAL SURRENDER TO DHARm  BY PEOPLES WHO FORGOT THEIR D
DHARm...

BUT THIS AMNESIA OF
 DHARm
IN A MINORITY OF HUMANITY
IN WORLD WARS 1 & 2
COST
65 MILLION HUMAN LIVES AND
DESTRUCTION OF CIVILIZATION
WHICH IS YET TO BE RESTORED AFTER 60 YEARS...

BUT IN SPITE OF THE COST OF WORLD WAR 1 &2
THE REALITY TODAY IS THAT
THE PSYCHIC, EMOTIONAL AND SPIRITUAL
SUB-CONSCIOUS SUFFERING
OF THE 2 MAJOR WARS IN EUROPE IN FIRST HALF OF THE 20TH CENTURY HAS LEFT THE "GENETIC" TRAITS OF
NON-HARMONIOUS CO-EXISTENT STILL SIMMERING TODAY......

BUT THE 2 WORLD WARS OF LAST CENTURY IS ALSO
THE INHERITED "GENETICS" OF
THE LAST 2500 YEARS OF WARS OF
COLONIALISM (SOMETIMES IN THE NAME OF GOD)...

AND AS "GENETICS" IS NEVER LOST
ALL OF THE ABOVE WARS ARE THE "GENETICS" OF
THE AFTER-EFFECTS OF THE
18-DAY WAR CALLED mHaabhaart WAR
WHICH CLAIMED THE LIVES OF OVER
1.7 BILLION PEOPLES SOME 5100 YEARS AGO...

SO WHERE WILL THE HUMAN "GENETICS" TAKE US IN
THE NEXT 1000 YEARS?

HISTORY REPEATS AND WITH NUCLEAR AGE
WHICH IS BEYOND HUMAN CONTROL NOW
THE FUTURE DOES NOT BODE WELL...

UNLESS HUMANITY CAN
"GENETICALLY" RE-ENGINEER ITSELF
TO CO-EXIST HARMONIOUSLY?????!!!!! 

WARS IN PRESENT TIME ERA  CALLED kli-yug
AS PER
veDik TIME CONCEPT OF CREATION CYCLES HAS A DEFINED PURPOSE:

"TO MAINTAIN AND UPHOLD
DHARm
AMONG HUMANITY TO THE EXTENT THAT IS ORDAINED IN kli-yug"

DHARm IS THE UNIVERSAL LAWS, RULES AND REGULATIONS
OF DAILY
CO-EXISTENCE OF ALL CREATIONS IN A
HARMONIOUS AND
NON-INJURIOUS LIFESTYLE

On this 60th anniversary of V-E Day PVAF prays that humanity will remember that the V-E concept did not stop the wars killing peoples and destroying civilizations....

After V-E day the humanity continues to experience Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Vietnam and Korean Wars, human oppression and destruction through undemocratic regimes, interference of religions and cultures by one community over another, greed of acquiring unfairly and unjustly wealth which belongs to others....and these are all wars which are still continuing...

TODAY PVAF ALSO INVITES YOU ALL TO OFFER "GENETIC" RE-ENGINEERING WHICH MUST CREATE THE GENES OF HARMONIOUS CO-EXISTENCE....
TO EXPRESS YOUR VIEWS PLEASE CLICK ON THE "POST A COMMENT" BUTTON IN THE HEADER OF THIS NEWS ITEM AND WRITE AWAY TILL HUMANITY IS RE-ENGINEERED FOR HARMONIOUS CO-EXISTENCE..

......om shaanti shaanti shaanti...
(may Creator grant us peace, peace & peace)

.......om paapM shaantM...
(may Creator help us to avert sinful kARm)

 

And to remind us of some of the facts of what happened in the World War 2 and also what is happening as an after-effect please click on the next line to read a Canadian perspective from Edmonton Journal....



A slaughter's long shadow
WORDS OF WAR

By the end of war in Europe 60 years ago today, more than one million Canadian men and women had enlisted for battle. The struggle to preserve their legacy continues on the printed page

By Marc Horton: Journal Books Editor


There is a scene in the oddly aloof film The Pianist where the detached protagonist, a concert pianist named Wladyslaw Szpilman, watches the destruction of the Warsaw ghetto from the window of the room where he is hiding.

Through almost unbelievable good luck and a natural stoicism, Szpilman, a Polish Jew, survived the war in which every member of his family died along with millions of others in the German concentration camps of the Second World War. Standing apart and in isolation was his key to living under unbearable conditions.

When Szpilman finally emerged from his hiding place and walked through the streets of his city, it was completely destroyed, and the landscape to which he returned was unrecognizable. Hardly a house remained standing, mountains of rubble turned every street into an obstacle course of bricks, paving stones, roof beams and dead bodies. The scene was so bleak and despairing as to be positively surreal.

The story told in the Roman Polanski movie is a true one. And the razing of Warsaw is true, too, a fact to which Gregor Dallas returns again and again in his grand and sweeping history of the aftermath of the Second World War.

During the Warsaw Uprising that lasted for two terrible months in the late summer and early autumn of 1944, more than 40,000 people in one suburb alone would be slaughtered by a special SS troop assigned to crush the revolt.

When the uprising ended on Oct. 1, not a soul remained of the city's 1.3 million population. Any who had managed to survive had been shipped to death camps.

What was shocking then, and what remains shocking today, is the Soviet army was within striking distance of the city and could have saved it. Stalin ordered otherwise, and even refused permission for the Royal Air Force to drop food and ammunition to the rebels until it was much too late.

There is a profound irony in all of this that Dallas understands. The Nazi invasion of Poland was the spark that ignited the war, and the defence of its freedom was the catalyst that sent millions of men and women to war. With the Red Army parked on its territory at the end of the Second World War, Poland would be lost again for more than two generations.

Poland's fate was a portent of what was to come to places like Hungary, East Germany, Romania, Czechoslovakia and the rest of Eastern Europe.

Shooting did end, but war's fallout lasted for generations

Dallas, the author of 1815: Roads to Waterloo and 1918: War and Peace, is an expert on how wars end ... or don't. In fact, it could be argued that the Second World War was an extension of the first, and that Europe needed the two decades in between to regroup, re-arm and catch her collective breath before the killing could being again.

His title, however, may be wrong. The war did end, although there was no formal peace conference and no real treaty signed between post-war allies, then at each other's throats, and the utterly vanquished forces of Nazi Germany. It just took a long, long time.

The irrefutable fact is that the war most certainly did not end in 1945 with the deaths of the monstrous Adolf Hitler and his bride, Eva Braun, in their stuffy, crowded and chaotic bunker in Berlin as the Soviet army closed in.

The war's aftermath would last for generations and can be seen in places like the Balkans, where fractious nationalism led to war crimes, and in the former Soviet states that now struggle with complicated futures. It could be seen in the Berlin Airlift in 1948, where Stalin tried to strangle the life out of West Berlin by blocking road and rail links to that part of the city, then under the control of Britain, France and the U.S. It could be seen in the Cold War and the arms race. It would live on in confrontations around the world, from the Cuban missile crisis to the Vietnam war.
 

"Whatever the claim of national mythologies," Dallas writes, "no one could seriously describe the peace of 1945 as a success, even when compared to 1919: Europe was divided on an unhistorical, ungeographical basis; Eastern Europeans were driven into slavery, their pre-war economies destroyed; Western Europeans faced dire poverty...."

Stalin, finding himself with a population of restless Jews, encouraged immigration to Israel, even if it meant running the British-imposed blockade of Israeli ports.
 

When Andrei Gromyko, whom Dallas describes as a "Soviet apparatchik incarnate," argued before the United Nations that Palestine be partitioned into two states, Jewish and Arab, Zionist leader Abba Eban called it "a godsend."

Although relations would quickly sour between Moscow and Israel, largely over the treatment of Jews in the Soviet Union, the stand by Stalin was a decisive one in turning the Middle East into a tinderbox of politics and religion.

The rancid consequences of the Second World War are, therefore, a bitter fact of life in this new century.

There are aspects of this book with which readers are sure to argue -- for example, Joe McCarthy's post-war anti-Communist rants in the U.S. Senate don't receive the condemnation they deserve, and the war in the South Pacific is given somewhat short shrift -- this is a compelling work of history that is crowded with profound observations on how the Second World War, fought by our fathers and grandfathers, has shaped the world in which we now live.

It is, also, a book that will appeal to general readers of history. Dallas is a writer with an eye for telling detail and a master of the vivid, colourful anecdote: de Gaulle and Churchill share a black Citroen while driving the Champs Elysees on Nov. 11, 1944; on April 30, 1945, days before Berlin would fall, the scent of lilac and hawthorn compete with the stench of rotting bodies. It was, after all, spring.

This book also speaks of the sweep of battle planning, punctuated with the kind of personal stories that prove no matter how grand -- and successful -- a strategy might be, it's always real people who ultimately pay the price.

Churchill's prescience de Gaulle's arrogance

What are valuable here, too, are the assessments of wartime leaders. Some of these may be familiar, but still bear repeating.

For example, Roosevelt, wearied by war and polio, failed to understand what Europe's future would be like with Soviet armies, which had borne the brunt of the fighting, encamped in places like Poland, Romania, Hungary and East Germany. Roosevelt would not live to see the ultimate consequences of his failure to stand up to the Soviets.

Churchill accurately predicted the future, and was ignored by his American allies. In his famous 1946 speech in Fulton, Mo., he warned of the Iron Curtain that would descend across Europe, and he spoke of the dark days that were sure to come to those nations that found themselves crushed under the Soviet heel.

De Gaulle, of course, was de Gaulle: self-centred, not a little arrogant and shockingly ungrateful.

By the time the last bullet was fired, the tanks were halted and the final bomb was dropped, national interests of former allies trumped everything else.

The shooting war did end. For the most part the killing stopped in 1945, with or without a formal peace treaty, unless you count the civil war in Greece that lasted until 1947.

And then, of course, there are the uncounted millions slaughtered by Stalin in the gulags, many of whom were former Soviet soldiers who had had the misfortune of being made German prisoners of war. Stalin, merciless as always, regarded surrender as treason.

For those victims of Stalin, and they are often the focus of the final chapters of this memorable and often moving history, the war would never really end.

So it is, then, that if readers want to know how the world grew into what it is today, why there was such a thing as a Berlin Wall and why it ultimately fell, and why the world remains torn by conflict and war, they need look no farther than Poisoned Peace.

mhorton@thejournal.canwest.com

The Edmonton Journal 2005

 



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