kARm (KARMA) CREATES THIS UNIVERSE AND EVERYTHING IN IT....SO STATES vED (VEDA) = SCIENCES OF LIFE AND CREATION.....
Posted by Vishva News Reporter on August 12, 2006

 

Karma ReportKarma Report

Having achieved a human birth
one must obtain freedom
from the circle of birth and death
by utilizing the birth well.

Adopt such a master
That a master again you do not need to seek.

Dwell in such a state
That a dwelling again you do not have to make

Undertake such a contemplation
That contemplation again
You do not have to undertake."
-Kabir

 

Karma

vEDIK kARm (karma) THEORY
OF EXPERIENCING
REACTION = ACTION
(similar to Newton's Second Law)

  • YOUR kARm (KARMA) = YOUR kARm-fl
     

  • kARm-fl = FRUITS OF ALL OF YOUR kARm PERFORMED WHICH ARE CREDITS AND DEBITS IN YOUR kARm-BANK.
     

  • kARm is everything you do in thoughts, words, and deeds that affect has a resulting effect on you and other creations with happiness or pain.
     

  • Whatever YOU have in your karma-bank is ONLY YOURS:
     

    • And YOU ONLY can and have to withdraw from your kARm-bank.  Nobody else can.
       

    • And ONLY YOU can and have to experience what you withdraw from your kARm-bank sometime, somewhere.
       

    • And ONLY YOU must experience what YOU had dished out - good or bad in thinking, speaking and doing.
       

    • And YOU will experience YOUR kARm-fl in the same intensity and effect that made others experience YOUR kARm when YOU dished it out.
       

  • Simply put, if your kARm hurt anybody then you have to experience your kARm-fl in the form of same hurt. And if your kARm made somebody happy then you will experience your kARm-fl in the form of same form of happiness.  
     

  • YOUR kARm-bank can never go bankrupt or stolen from or no debit or credit can be deleted or erased....
     

  • ONLY YOU must experience what is in YOUR kARm-bank to the same effect and intensity with which you filled your kARm-bank...
     

  • And all results of YOUR kARm, without any exception whatsoever, goes into your kARm-bank as kARm-fl..
     

  • So then, next time you do a kARm....realize and rest assured that:

    •  YOU will have to experience the same happiness or pain that you offered to someone else;

    • regardless of YOU did what YOU did knowingly or unknowingly and

    • all YOU did in YOUR thoughts, words and actions.... 

(The above knowledge has been shared by SHRii Champaklal Dajibhai Mistry of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada from his vED library with a prayer that: LET YOU BE BLESSED WITH INSPIRATION TO DO WHAT YOU WISH OTHERS TO DO TO YOU..) 

Please continue reading in the right hand column which is presented  by this knowledge-sharing PVAF web site as today's news story from the place on this planet earth called superpower USA......

And just imagine what USA can do as a superpower if it started living vEDik lifestyle based on the sciences of creation and life called vED in sNskrut language....

Understanding of Karma Theory
In Western Civilization

  • Karma, according to many Eastern religions, is the ultimate in objective justice--the innately moral music to which our universe twirls.
     

  • It's a concept that predates Christianity by a thousand years, but for some it's cutting-edge trendy.
     

  • Karma dictates that, sooner or later, we reap what we sow. Like many other spiritual beliefs, karma is a paradox.
     

  • It's simple but filled with subtle complexities.

Karma Theory as per David Gardiner, a Buddhist and assistant professor of religion at Colorado College:

  • "The philosophy of karma--real karma--is too complex to fit comfortably on a T-shirt.
     

  • "Karma is not just some kind of destiny that is written in the stars.
     

  • What goes around comes around"--a phrase often used to describe karma--doesn't mean much of anything.
     

  • A better phrase, he says, is "you get what you give."
     

  • The word karma means action, and people are constantly racking up karmic credits and debits in their daily lives.
     

  • Building homeless shelters would build up good karma. Ignoring the homeless, or ridiculing them--or worse yet, burning down someone's house, would be a karmic no-no.
     

  • What we do now will create new fruits in the future.
     

  • It's not a deterministic theory. It has a free will."
     

  • Sometimes, it's not so much a cause and effect, but you hurt yourself by the action," said Gardiner. Donating to a charity makes you feel good. Stealing a candy bar brings on guilt."

Karma Theory of Kailash Jaitly, a Hindu in western civilization:

  • "In Western religions, people are punished for their sins. In karma, people are punished BY their sins.
     

  • It all depends on natural laws. Nobody intervenes. The only one who can intervene is you.
     

  • Sometimes karmic retribution is obvious--like when someone cuts down a tree illegally and the tree falls down on the would-be-lumberjack's car. But often payback is subtle and internal.
     

  •  Karma isn't necessarily a tit-for-tat morality system. It's cumulative--like cholesterol.
     

  • Most Hindus and Buddhists believe in reincarnation, and that our present-life circumstances are determined by our past-life actions.
     

  • This is the reason why we believe some people are born in privilege and some people are born in poverty. Karma is continuing and effecting."

Please click on the  line outside this box to continue learning the details of the kARm Theory understanding in Wichita, Kansas, USA from newspaper The Wichita Eagle: ....the above summary in the following context:

  • But you can't fool karma

  • Credits and debits of Karma

  • Misunderstandings of Karma abound

  • Ethical forces at play in Karma

  • Cost-benefit ratio of Karma

cell phone japan

 



 

 

KARMA = YOUR CREDITS AND DEBITS OF
GOOD AND BAD
THINKING, SPEAKING AND DOING


 

The Wichita Eagle: July 1, 2006: BY PAUL ASAY, The Gazette
 

You can fool all of the people some of the time. You can fool some of the people all of the time.

But you can't fool karma

Karma, according to many Eastern religions, is the ultimate in objective justice -- the innately moral music to which our universe twirls. Karma dictates that, sooner or later, we reap what we sow.

Like many other spiritual beliefs, karma is a paradox. It's simple but filled with subtle complexities. It's a concept that predates Christianity by a thousand years, but for some it's cutting-edge trendy.

The Karmadu Web site (www.karmadu.com) encourages its members to send "good karma" to fellow surfers. Moonlight Fighter Productions sells a variety of karma-related T-shirts, jackets, mugs and even thongs (www.cafepress.com/moonlight fight/918953). Alicia Keys' song "Karma" includes the lyrics "What goes around comes around/ What goes up must come down."

And then there's NBC's freshman hit "My Name Is Earl," in which the disheveled title character tries to repair his tattered karma an episode at a time.

"Bad luck might be contagious," Earl muses. "It wouldn't be fair to bring someone into your life until you clean yours up."

Credits and debits of Karma

All this attention can be a karmic wash for Hindus and Buddhists. Sure, they say, it's nice to have a bit of Eastern spiritualism find a comfy spot in popular culture. And it's great if it gets folks thinking in karmic terms. But the philosophy of karma -- real karma -- is too complex to fit comfortably on a T-shirt.

Misunderstandings of Karma abound

"Karma is not just some kind of destiny that is written in the stars," said David Gardiner, assistant professor of religion at Colorado College.

Gardiner, a Buddhist, thinks "what goes around comes around" -- a phrase often used to describe karma -- doesn't mean much of anything. A better phrase, he says, is "you get what you give."

The word karma means action, and people are constantly racking up karmic credits and debits in their daily lives, according to Gardiner. Building homeless shelters would build up good karma. Ignoring the homeless, or ridiculing them -- or worse yet, burning down someone's house, would be a karmic no-no.

"What we do now will create new fruits in the future," Gardiner said. "It's not a deterministic theory. It has a free will."


 

Ethical forces at play in Karma

At first glance, the whole good deed/bad deed thing might look similar to the Western religious concept of good works and sin, in which adherents believe rewards and punishments are doled out by God.

Buddhists and Hindus don't believe in a hands-on deity, which means the universe itself is, in some mysterious way, moral: Along with the laws of physics, there are ethical forces at play -- forces that people can no more escape than they can gravity or time.

In Western religions, people are punished for their sins. In karma, people are punished BY their sins.

"It all depends on natural laws," said Kailash Jaitly, a Hindu. "Nobody intervenes. The only one who can intervene is you."

Sometimes, Jaitly said, karmic retribution is obvious -- like when someone cuts down a tree illegally and the tree falls down on the would-be lumberjack's car.

But often payback is subtle and internal.

"Sometimes, it's not so much a cause and effect, but you hurt yourself by the action," said Gardiner. Donating to a charity makes you feel good. Stealing a candy bar brings on guilt.

Karma, Jaitly said, isn't necessarily a tit-for-tat morality system. It's cumulative -- like cholesterol.

"If I do a bad deed, that doesn't mean I'm doomed," he said. "It's kind of a sum total of all the good things I do and all the bad things I do."

Cost-benefit ratio of Karma

That sum can be carried over into another life. Most Hindus and Buddhists believe in reincarnation, and that our present-life circumstances are determined by our past-life actions.

"This is the reason why we believe some people are born in privilege and some people are born in poverty," Jaitly said. "Karma is continuing and effecting."

Gardiner says some karmic believers can feel powerless in the face of this cosmic force: They blame bad situations -- poverty, relationships, even plain bad luck -- on karma, which Gardiner says is the wrong way to look at the force. We make our own karmic bed, he believes, and it's always our duty to make it better.

Sometimes, though, the karmic cost-benefit ratio is not always clear-cut. Take euthanasia, for instance. In Buddhism, killing is always bad. But eliminating suffering is always good.

While society still struggles with this issue, Gardiner believes karma looks at euthanasia with understanding eyes.

"Taking the life of someone who is undergoing extreme suffering, the negative karma of that killing would be much, much less," Gardiner said.

Ethical quandaries like this don't fit neatly on a T-shirt.


 



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