SCIENTIST TRYING TO FIND "GOD PARTICLE" to FIND GOD?????!!!!!!....vED says any and all paths of finding CREATOR one chooses will lead to CREATOR ultim
Posted by Vishva News Reporter on March 17, 2007

 

THE PROOF OF EXISTENCE OF
HIGGS BOSON -THE GOD'S PARTICLE
IS SUPPOSE TO EXPLAIN
95 PERCENT OF WHAT EXISTS
IN THIS UNIVERSE

THAT WE CANNOT SEE OR MEASURE BUT IS MATHEMATICALLY CALCULATED BY SCIENTIST TO EXIST....
CURRENT SCIENCE CAN ONLY SEE AND EXPLAIN 5 PERCENT OF MATTER MAKING THE UNIVERSE WE LIVE IN...

Everything that you can see in the universe -- stars, planets, whole galaxies, or indeed the furniture in your room, the clothes you wear, and you -- is made of subatomic particles called quarks. Quarks are what you will find if you take a nucleus, pry open the protons and electrons, and gaze inside. Anything that you can see and touch and feel is ultimately made of quarks.

But this picture gets very complex at the sub-atomic level.....

And about this complexity, University of Toronto's Prof. Robert S. Orr is the lead physicist NSERC Principal Investigator for ATLAS Canada says:

  • "So that seems a nice picture of the world,. But what astronomers have found is that most of the mass of the universe doesn't consist of this. If we look at our solar system, it seems okay.

  • The planets behave just as Newton thought they would. But if we look at the galaxies, we see they behave in ways we didn't expect. We know they behave that way because something is exerting gravity, but it's something we can't see. We call it dark matter.

  • You cannot see dark matter, because it does not interact with light. Yet as you read these lines, it is all around you in the room. It is imponderable.

  • When we calculate it all up, we find that the matter we see is only about 5 per cent of the universe. This doesn't make sense, but it gets worse."

  • Science cannot account for this by adding up the forces of observed matter and the calculations of how much dark matter there should be. There had to be something else.

  • They call it dark energy. In this view, the universe is 5 per cent observable matter, 25 per cent dark matter and 70 per cent dark energy.

And the answer to the unaccountable 95 percent of the mathematically calculable mass of the universe is currently speculated by scientists to be explainable by finding Higgs Field which is believed to pervade all space in the universe....and Higgs Boson is the is the named particle which may create this Higgs Field...in the same way that photons creates the currently known electromagnetic field.....  

And to catch this Higgs Boson Particle which is currently called by scientists as GOD'S PARTICLE,  7,000 scientists from 54 countries have build the "Large Hadron Collider" which is a 27-kilometre-long tunnel that begins 30 storeys beneath the western suburbs of Geneva and describes a vast circle extending into France with a slowly curving course below the slopes of the Jura mountains and returning to where it began at a cost of US$9.5-billion.....

In the next few months, in this Hadron Collider  will be fire protons in opposite directions into the tunnel at close to speed of light (299,792,458 metres per second or 1 billion 79 million 252 thousand 848 km/h) .....and photograph with digital cameras the collision of protons which lasts for less than one thousandth of a nanosecond (nanosecond = one billionth of a second) releasing instantly vanishing materials.....Not only that but there will be 800 million collisions every second to be photographed to find Higgs Boson... 

 

Image:The New Atom.svg

This model of a helium atom shows the electrons (yellow), the protons (grey), and the neutrons (pink). Also shown are the up quarks (red), and the down quarks (blue) that make up the nucleons as well as the gluons (black) which hold the quarks together. (YOU CAN LEARN ABOUT ATOM ON WIKIPEDIA BY CLICKING HERE)


But scientist are calling this Higgs Boson the GOD PARTICLE from the following "unscientific thinking-beliefs" which leads them into the realm of GOD and metaphysics:

  • In 20th-century physics, it's been discovered that there are intrinsic unpredictabilities in nature and that means there are higher levels of causation and causal principles than those proposed by classical physics.

  • This is not to say that such higher principles necessarily spell God, but the existence of God can be demonstrated in a logically coercive way... suggesting that God is the most reasonable answer to the question posed by German mathematician Gottfried Leibniz: Why is there something rather than nothing?

  • "God particle" simply reflect the desire of physicists to express concepts in language that indicates the importance of the idea.

  • Einstein said that the most incomprehensible thing about the universe is that it's comprehensible. The physical world is rationally transparent and rationally beautiful, and that gives science wonderment.

  • Scientists feel the awe and beauty about the universe through the beautiful mathematical equations with which they explains this universe and for many this becomes a religious experience.

  • It is almost irresistible for humans to believe that we have some special relation to the universe and that life on Earth is just a tiny part of an overwhelmingly hostile universe destined for a future extinction of endless cold or intolerable heat. The more the universe seems comprehensible, the more it also seems pointless.

  • All of the above gives comfort to proponents of the theory of Intelligent Design simply by saying that "the curtain drawn over the mystery of Creation will never be raised by human efforts, at least in the foreseeable future." Physicists don't say, 'Let me prove God, only that there are bigger questions than physics can answer, questions raised by physics itself, such as 'Why is everything here?'

You can click on the underlined hilites to learn more on the topics... And please continue reading in the columns below and on the next page the details of the above news summary which is KNOWLEDGE to lead YOU ultimately to YOUR CREATOR....and on the way with KNOWLEDGE you will understand YOURSELF and OTHERS better to co-exist happier TOMORROW THAN TODAY.....
 

Fermilab, USA: June 8, 2004: The Higgs boson has been called the missing link in the Standard Model of Particles and Fields, the theory that's been used to explain fundamental physics since the 1970s. Prior to 1995 the top quark was also missing, but then the experimental teams working at the Tevatron's two large detector systems, D-Zero and CDF, were able to discover it independently.

Scientists believe that the Higgs boson, named for Scottish physicist Peter Higgs, who first theorized its existence in 1964, is responsible for particle mass, the amount of matter in a particle.

According to the theory, a particle acquires mass through its interaction with the Higgs field, which is believed to pervade all of space and has been compared to molasses that sticks to any particle rolling through it. The Higgs field would be carried by Higgs bosons, just as the electromagnetic field is carried by photons."In the Standard Model, the Higgs boson mass is correlated with top quark mass," says Madaras, "so an improved measurement of the top quark mass gives more information about the possible value of the Higgs boson mass."

 



According to the Standard Model, at the beginning of the universe there were six different types of quarks. Top quarks exist only for an instant before decaying into a bottom quark and a W boson, which means those created at the birth of the universe are long gone. However, at Fermilab's Tevatron, the most powerful collider in the world, collisions between billions of protons and antiprotons yield an occasional top quark. Despite their brief appearances, these top quarks can be detected and characterized by the D-Zero and CDF experiments.

In a case of the plot thickening as the mystery unfolds, the Higgs boson has just gotten heavier, even though the subatomic particle has yet to be found. In a letter to the scientific journal Nature, published in the June 10, 2004 issue, an international collaboration of scientists working at the Tevatron accelerator of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), report the most precise measurements yet for the mass of the top quark a subatomic particle that has been found and this requires an upward revision for the long-postulated but still undetected Higgs boson.

"Since the top quark mass we are reporting is a bit higher than previously measured, it means the most likely value of the Higgs mass is also higher," says Ron Madaras, a physicist with the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), who heads the local participation in the D-Zero experiment at the Tevatron. "The most likely Higgs mass has now been increased from 96 to 117 GeV/c2" GeV/c2 is a common particle-physics unit of mass; the mass of the proton measures about 1 GeV/c2 "which means it's probably beyond the sensitivity of current experiments, but very likely to be found in future experiments at the Large Hadron Collider being built at CERN."

 

The above June 4, 2005 news has been updated with this news item....please click on the next line to read various thoughts and speculations on whether the current science will find Higgs Boson which could explain to humanity the missing 95 percent of the mathematically calculated mass of creation existing in this universe....and then may be the science world will start believing in the existence of the CREATOR whom the current humanity universally calls GOD......



 

A GLEAM IN GOD'S EYE
Next year, Canada will take part in a $9.5-billion international project to find
the Higgs boson,
the 'God particle'

that physicists theorize gives mass to matter. 
Their exciting search
brings up essential questions about
faith, the universe and existence


Canadian Globe and Mail: December 25, 2006: MATTHEW HART

If it were not for a subatomic particle known as the Higgs boson, Rudolph the red-nosed reindeer, the sleigh full of presents and fat old Mr. Claus himself would not weigh anything at all. They would be matter without mass and, instead of landing on your roof, might easily just float away into the Christmas sky, spreading dismay among children everywhere and sending a generation of scientists back to the drawing board.

The question of why it is that we have mass is one of the uncertainties of contemporary physics, and a series of breathtaking experiments planned for the new year, when physicists will create conditions that existed one-thousandth of a billionth of a second after the Big Bang, is expected to reveal the tiny particle that accounts for mass. Or not.

The Higgs boson is theoretical: It has never been observed. It was proposed in the 1960s by Peter Higgs of the University of Edinburgh to account for mass. It works (if it exists) by setting up a field that permeates space and affects the other particles of matter, resisting their free passage; this resistance effectively gives them mass. It is the only subatomic constituent of what is called the Standard Model of particle physics that has remained invisible, and scientists would dearly love to know if it is really there.

Now, at last, as festive lights flash and twinkle in the winter air, the world's physicists are also ablaze, animated by the prospect of laying hands on the tiny speck known affectionately by a term that places it close to the origin of Creation: "the God particle."

It is a wily phrase. It suggests a thing that is also an act, a dynamic idea of something unimaginably small that is also the size of heaven. And it launches a cascade of speculation that includes fantastic mathematical precision, causes knowable and unknowable, and the playing field where they meet.

"There is a sort of cosmic religion among physicists," asserts John Polkinghorne, a particle physicist, former professor of mathematical physics at Cambridge University and now a theologian. "I don't say necessarily this means a belief in a personal God or a Christian God. Einstein, for example, believed in Spinoza's God -- a sort of pantheistic God. But he said that when he made his great discoveries, he felt like a child in the presence of his elders."

Prof. Polkinghorne says many scientists feel "wonderment" at the physical universe. If so, it matches the mood of anticipation that enlivens the researchers now preparing to expose the elusive particle at the heart of matter.

In a series of experiments scheduled to begin late next year, marshalling 7,000 scientists from 54 countries, researchers will take a hammer to the tiniest constituents of matter. In the front line of this assault is a team of Canadian physicists. Canada's research on the project dates back 15 years, and the instruments developed are important elements in the campaign now afoot to scrutinize the titanic forces soon to be unleashed.

The site of the coming apocalypse is a 27-kilometre-long tunnel that begins 30 storeys beneath the western suburbs of Geneva and describes a vast circle extending into France, following a slowly curving course below the slopes of the Jura mountains and returning to where it began.

Inside the tunnel and adjoining caverns, the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and its fellow participants are assembling the largest scientific instrument ever built - the Large Hadron Collider.

The $9.5-billion apparatus (a cost shared among participating countries) will fire protons in opposite directions into the tunnel at high velocities. Even before the protons enter the tunnel they will meet pieces of Canadian equipment -- a set of 100 complex magnets developed at TRIUMF, Canada's subatomic research laboratory on the campus of the University of British Columbia. Later, the magnets were built in Quebec City, and then installed at CERN. Their job is to boost the speed of a proton on its way into the tunnel.

Although the circular tunnel's great length means that the curve is gradual, the protons will move so fast that powerful forces must guide the particles down the centre of the tunnel and prevent them from hurtling into the walls. Thus, another series of magnets will deliver into the tunnel a force equal to the thrust of a jumbo jet every metre.

When proton hits proton at close to the speed of light, each will have the impetus of a 400-tonne freight train moving at 190 kilometres an hour. As the protons annihilate each other, a mist of minute dots of wreckage will explode from the collision. One of these should be the Higgs boson.

The problem is to catch it. The specks vanish almost as soon as they are born. Each lasts something less than one thousandth of a nanosecond. Not only that: There will be 800 million collisions every second, each one spraying the collider tunnel with a shower of instantly vanishing material. Obviously it takes a burly piece of kit to sift this subatomic maelstrom.

"We need to collect a sample of several hundred collisions out of 40 million," says Richard Teuscher of the University of Toronto, now attached to CERN. "And we have just a few millionths of a second to decide whether a collision has produced something interesting."

Two detector chambers installed in the collider will snatch this information. One, called the CMS, is a massive contraption of computers and instruments twice the weight of the Eiffel Tower. It will retrieve 10 million gigabytes of data every year, including the 40 million pictures per second captured by a pixel detector -- a sort of digital camera from hell. These sensors, made of thin layers of silicon, will be placed closest to the collision point where proton smashes into proton. When a particle flies through them, they signal the computers which tiny pixel on their surface has been penetrated, pinpointing the exact position of the particle.

So precise is this positioning that scientists can tell whether the particle originated at the proton-proton collision point or a few millimetres from it, which would mean that it was the byproduct of another particle.

"A billion protons are colliding every second," says Jim Virdee of Imperial College London. "We are creating conditions that existed just after the Big Bang. It's very early in time so it's very high energy.

"We are taking a step that creates 10 times more energy than any previous experiment. We know that at those energies the Standard Model breaks down, so we know something is going to happen. We may find particles we've never seen before. Maybe nature has sorted things out in a way we haven't thought of."

Because they are probing so far back into the origins of time and matter, and drawing fundamental conclusions, the physicists need to trust their data. So there are two teams ransacking the events that happen when the protons collide. Prof. Virdee's is one. Then there are the Canadians.

"It's just us and 2,000 of our closest friends," says William Trischuk, a University of Toronto physics professor and director of Canada's Institute of Particle Physics. The detector that Canadians are working on is called ATLAS -- an apparatus whose computers fill an underground chamber big enough to hold the 13-storey physics building on the Toronto campus. Although the scientists working on both detectors are colleagues, rivalry flourishes.

"Absolutely there's a feeling of competition," Prof. Trischuk says. "We're at our detector and they're at theirs, 15 kilometres away along the tunnel. It's a friendly and not-so-friendly competition. They have their system and we have ours, and we're chasing the same discoveries."

Prof. Trischuk has been stalking the Higgs boson for 16 years, as a staffer at CERN from 1990 until 1996, and then as a member of the Toronto faculty. While in Toronto, he conducted his research initially at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Chicago, but has since returned his focus to the ATLAS project at CERN. In that time, Canada's commitment to higher research has steadily increased, and the country's investment in the ATLAS detector specifically and the accelerator complex as a whole now totals about $100-million.

"I'm not the only person coming back to Canada," he says. "Canadian physicists have been coming home to be involved in this."

The equipment offers a rare opportunity. "The collider is much more powerful than the one at Fermi. If we don't find the Higgs boson, we'll find something else."

What else might the team find? One surprise could be black holes. Physicists have long supposed the universe contains dimensions other than the ones we are familiar with. In one of those dimensions, gravity may be much stronger than it is in our reality. If the forces unleashed in the collider should happen to pry open that dimension, matter could compress into a miniature black hole.

"You should not deduce that we are ready to build a black hole, and CERN along with the planet will disappear," says Robert Aymar, head of CERN, "although this is a letter I receive every week."

But fear of calamity is rare at the site. Eagerness is in the air. Amid such buoyant moods, it is easy to forget that the last bid to find the Higgs boson came up empty. Researchers at the previous CERN particle smasher, the Large Electron Positron Collider, admitted defeat five years ago after rummaging vainly through their data.

"God particle may not exist," one headline trumpeted.

"It's more likely than not that there is no Higgs," said one disheartened scientist.

But even then, other physicists were looking ahead to the Large Hadron Collider, envisioning a wedge that would finally be powerful enough to jam open Creation. Now, with the first attempt only months away, a sense of exhilaration is palpable among them. It is as if they stood at the threshold of discovery, knowing that but a push would swing the door open and reveal the secrets, heaped in subatomic space like so much treasure.

"With the energies available before, they couldn't find the boson," John Polkinghorne says. "But this collider will have almost certainly enough energy to find the particle, if it's there."

At the age of 49, after a distinguished career, Prof. Polkinghorne resigned his chair in physics at Cambridge and studied for the Anglican priesthood. Now 76, a Fellow of the Royal Society, a knight and canon theologian of the diocese of Liverpool, he writes and lectures widely on his conviction that science and religion are part of the same reality, each in its own way mapping a shared landscape.

A short, bristling figure with untidy silver hair and a vigorous, intensely warm manner, Prof. Polkinghorne believes there are higher levels of causation than those proposed by classical physics.

"In 20th-century physics, it's been discovered that there are intrinsic unpredictabilities in nature," he says. "Everyone would agree about that. There's no question about it. There is more going on than simple reductive physical science will be able to define. And that means there is scope for the operation of higher causal principles."

 

New measurements of top quark mass at Fermilab have revised estimates for the mass of the Higgs boson. (June 9, 2004)






This is not to say that such higher principles necessarily spell God, nor does Prof. Polkinghorne believe that the existence of God "can be demonstrated in a logically coercive way." That said, he does believe in God, suggesting that God is the most reasonable answer to the question posed by German mathematician Gottfried Leibniz: Why is there something rather than nothing?

Prof. Polkinghorne is also seduced by what he calls the fruitfulness of mathematical beauty.

"When physicists are looking for a new level of theory, it's turned out time and time again that the equations that work are beautiful. So it's a principle to look for beautiful equations. Paul Dirac [the quantum-theory founder and former colleague of Prof. Polkinghorne] hated ugly equations, and said the history of physics was against them. He made a number of important discoveries by looking for beautiful equations. He called it 'a very profitable religion.'

"The physical world is rationally transparent and rationally beautiful, and that gives science wonderment. You don't see that in the scientific papers, but scientists talk about it all the time."

"Oh, absolutely," says David Wilkinson, another physicist-turned-theologian. "Among physicists, there's a sense of beauty in the universe. Einstein said that the most incomprehensible thing about the universe is that it's comprehensible. And [Nobel-winning physicist] Richard Feynman talked about the awe that scientists feel about the universe, and said that for many this was a religious experience. And Feynman was not a Christian, nor sympathetic to Christianity."

Prof. Wilkinson, a Fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society, completed his PhD on the subject of star formation and the chemical evolution of galaxies. Later, he studied theology at Cambridge and trained for the Methodist ministry. He is now principal of St. John's College, Durham University, where he is Wesley Research Lecturer in Theology and Science.

For Prof. Wilkinson, terms such as "God particle" simply reflect the desire of physicists to express concepts in language that indicates the importance of the idea.

Yet while the term was coined by a physicist -- Nobel winner Leon Lederman -- its implications bother some scientists. Robert Orr, a physicist at the University of Toronto and leader of Canada's ATLAS team, prefers the words of Stephen Weinberg, himself a Nobel laureate in physics, who wrote that although it is "almost irresistible for humans to believe that we have some special relation to the universe," life on Earth "is just a tiny part of an overwhelmingly hostile universe" destined for a "future extinction of endless cold or intolerable heat. The more the universe seems comprehensible, the more it also seems pointless."

Inevitably, even the most cautious phrasing can land a scientist in the midst of controversy. Robert Jastrow, a theoretical physicist who was founding director of the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Goddard Institute for Space Studies, was accused of giving comfort to proponents of the theory of intelligent design simply by saying that "the curtain drawn over the mystery of Creation will never be raised by human efforts, at least in the foreseeable future."

"Physicists don't say, 'Let me prove God,' " Prof. Wilkinson says, "only that there are bigger questions than physics can answer, questions raised by physics itself, such as 'Why is everything here?' "

If physicists feel wonder when they behold the universe, it cannot be much more profound than what the rest of us get from beholding physicists. In the collider project, the apparatus alone challenges the imagination.

Last month, the largest superconducting magnet ever built was tested in its mountain cave, 100 metres underground. It weighs 100 tonnes and will supply the magnetic field ATLAS needs to perform its tasks. When powered, it will produce 21,000 amps, the energy equivalent, in yet another metaphor, of 10,000 cars travelling at 70 kilometres an hour. The magnetic energy is needed, says Canadian physicist Richard Teuscher, to manage the exploding particles.

"Once you've collided the protons, the particles shoot out in every direction," he said. "So you have to identify what they are. The way you identify them is to bend them in a certain direction. You need a huge amount of magnetic energy to do that. If one bends in a clockwise direction, for example, depending on how we've set up the magnet, then we know it's a positive particle."

Canada's ATLAS team includes about 40 tenured professors, 25 postdoctoral fellows and 50 graduate students, drawn from 11 universities and several institutions across the country. As well as searching for the Higgs boson, they will be looking for evidence to support the heady conception of the universe current in physics.

According to this view, everything that you can see in the universe -- stars, planets, whole galaxies, or indeed the furniture in your room, the clothes you wear, and you -- is made of subatomic particles called quarks. Quarks are what you will find if you take a nucleus, pry open the protons and electrons, and gaze inside. Anything that you can see and touch and feel is ultimately made of quarks.

"So that seems a nice picture of the world," Robert Orr says. "But what astronomers have found is that most of the mass of the universe doesn't consist of this. If we look at our solar system, it seems okay. The planets behave just as Newton thought they would. But if we look at the galaxies, we see they behave in ways we didn't expect. We know they behave that way because something is exerting gravity, but it's something we can't see. We call it dark matter."

You cannot see dark matter, because it does not interact with light. Yet as you read these lines, it is all around you in the room. It is, in Prof. Orr's word, "imponderable. When we calculate it all up, we find that the matter we see is only about 5 per cent of the universe. This doesn't make sense, but it gets worse."

The extra puzzler came from the expansion of the universe. For decades, astronomers expected that the rate at which the universe expanded, propelled outward from the Big Bang, would decrease. But about 10 years ago they discovered that, in fact, it was speeding up.

Science cannot account for this by adding up the forces of observed matter and the calculations of how much dark matter there should be. There had to be something else. They call it dark energy. In this view, the universe is 5 per cent observable matter, 25 per cent dark matter and 70 per cent dark energy.

To probe that mystery at CERN, the Canadians have installed in the tunnel's detection chamber a calorimeter (heat detector) composed of sheets of copper, lead and tungsten, enclosing layers of very cold liquid argon. Particles passing through the argon leave a footprint. Since the signatures of particles of observable matter are identifiable, everything else could be dark matter.

If the ratio of observable matter to dark matter conforms to suppositions, then everything not accounted for in the mathematics of the expanding universe should be dark energy.

"The question of dark energy, of what it is, is the big question in cosmology," Richard Teuscher says. No one in the ATLAS team suggests that they will solve it. But they hope to find, if not its essence, its shadow.

So all that we see is a sliver of what is -- and much of that is rushing away from us propelled by forces no one understands. If God so loved the world, as the gospel says, He did not seem to think He had to make it simple.

The star that the three kings followed to Bethlehem -- where is it now?

It must be where it always was -- in the same vast storehouse that contains the known structure of the universe, the idea of dark energy, the habits of belief, the will to see. It must be in the roomiest domains we know, the heart and mind of man.

Matthew Hart is a Canadian writer based in London.

Jim Virdee, Imperial College London:

"We know something is going to happen. We may find particles we've never seen before. Maybe nature has sorted things out in a way we haven't thought of."

John Polkinghorne, particle physicist turned theologian, Cambridge:

"There is more going on than simple reductive physical science will be able to define. And that means there is scope for the operation of higher causal principles."

David Wilkinson, Lecturer in Theology and Science, Durham University:

"Physicists don't say, 'Let me prove God.' Only that there are bigger questions than physics can answer, questions raised by physics itself, such as 'why is everything here?' "

Canadian physicist Richard Teuscher:

"The question of dark energy, of what it is, is the big question in cosmology."

Robert Orr, University of Toronto:

"When we calculate it all up, we find that the matter we see is only about 5 per cent of the universe."

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There are 1 additional comments.

#1 Posted by Jashvant Prajapati on 12/28/2006
I am very happy to see the web and am proud of being Prajapati. I am inspired to do lot manythings in the interest of the society by helping our samaj.

Hope it will reach to the all active members of the organization.

A great web for the great people of great land.

Jaishree Krishna.


 

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