JOBS WITH MONEY...CHANGING IN NORTH AMERICA....with increasing technology industries...from now to the year 2020.....
Posted by Vishva News Reporter on August 23, 2012

 




Documenting Success
....an April 19, 2011  new study
from TD Economics says:
  • For the first time since 1999
    the United States more people work
    in highly skilled and low-skilled jobs
     
  • as the technological revolution
    marginalizes secretaries, bookkeepers, factory workers and clerks...
  • This means middle-skilled jobs, which in 1999,
     gave American workers
    50% employment are disappearing...
  • Technology does not have borders.....
    thus this change in workforce will be happening in Canada and
    the rest of the industrialized and developing nations....
  • The two jobs for growth at the high end of the skills scale
    were projected to be

     biomedical engineers
    and
     network and systems and data communications analysts.
PVAF is sharing the above very vital life-knowledge so that you can continue to prosper as you wish on your chosen or new life-path with your personal life-plan based on knowledge of the changing/evolving job market in your region of residence..... 
 
To read detailed summary of the above noted job market report please click on the next line.....
....AND KEEP ON SCROLLING TO EDUCATE YOURSELF FOR THE NEXT DECADE'S
JOB MARKET IN NORTH AMERICA...
..
.....so that you would know how to
continually prosper as much as you wish
with you next 5 and 10-year Life Plans....  
 
.
Financial Post
Demand for highly skilled workers like laboratory technicians is increasing in Canada.
Photograph by: Ian Lindsay, Postmedia News Service, Financial Post
Demand for highly skilled workers like laboratory technicians
is increasing in Canada.

.....Shifting skill demand....
....Some workers are pushed down the skills ladder: Economist....
....Says Beata Caranci, deputy chief economist with TD
and author of the study TD ECONOMICS....
(From: Edmonton Journal: April 21, 2011:By Eric Lam, Financial Poster:lam@nationalpost.com;
Copyright (c) The Edmonton Journal)

 
For the first time, the United States has more people working in highly skilled and low-skilled jobs than middle-skilled workers as the technological revolution marginalizes secretaries, bookkeepers, factory workers and clerks, a new study from TD Economics said Tuesday, April 19, 2011.

After a decade of decline, the middle-skilled group of workers in the United States officially fell to a minority 49% of the total workforce in 2009, said Beata Caranci, deputy chief economist with TD and author of the study, in an interview.

In 1999, TD data showed 55% of Americans worked in so-called middle-skilled jobs.

Between 1999 and 2009, the proportion of high-skill workers rose to 31% from 27%, while 20% of U.S. workers were in low-skill occupations, a two-percentage-point increase.

While the results were focused on the United States, the trend is practically a universal one among developed economies, suggesting Canada's workforce faces a similar shift.

"Technology does not have borders. We've seen the same kind of downsizing in manufacturing here," she said. "If the premise is any routine task can be replaced by technology, then Canadian jobs would be subject to the same forces."

This is likely because many middle-skill workers, who are neither the highest-paid nor the highesteducated, hold jobs that are heavily repetitive.

This includes book-keeping, clerical work, or repetitive production tasks, which have all suffered as computers and the rise of the Internet have accelerated the speed of automation over the past decade.

Highly skilled positions, on the other hand, often require high-level reasoning or complex decision-making.

And low-skill positions tend to be the domain of those with little formal education and focused on manual labour. Examples include janitors and security personnel.

This leaves Ontario, home to a wide manufacturing base as well as well-developed financial services and major technology hubs, in an awkward position.




"Ontario is a bit unique. Whereas in the United States the Northeast has carved out a hub and a firstmover advantage in biotech, and venture capital markets on top of the South, which has a labour advantage of its own in terms of the low cost of labour, Ontario is a mix of the two," she said. "So it might not be a story of the province, but rather of regions, say Toronto versus Windsor."

In the United States, northeastern states such as New Jersey, Massachusetts, New York and Connecticut have developed an advantage in attracting highly skilled labour, while sunny southern states such as Florida, dependent on the tourism industry, are dominated by low-skill jobs while also nurturing burgeoning high-skill industries.>
Stuck playing catch-up are states and regions with large middle-skill manufacturing bases, such as the Carolinas and sprawling manufacturing centres in southwestern Ontario.

While some workers can be retrained, such as a bookkeeper learning to use account software, not all middle-skilled workers will get the opportunity.

"The question is what to do with those middle-skilled workers who lose those jobs," Ms. Caranci said. "The idea is to push them up the skills ladder, and that's a policy challenge."

However, there is a real risk that a portion of those workers are being pushed down the ladder instead.

"We can't have everybody in the same job. You do need someone to clean those buildings and dig those ditches. The unfortunate thing is middle-skilled jobs are better-paying. And if it is those people who are losing out on opportunities to move up, then that means less money circulating in consumption and less money to pay off debt," Ms. Caranci said.

Interestingly though, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics has identified the top five fastest-growing low-skill professions in the United States projected through 2018 as all health related, including home health aides, physical therapist aides, as well as dental and medical assistants.

Considering the aging populations on both sides of the border, it is likely Canada will also see strong growth in this sector, she said.

The two jobs for growth at the high end of the skills scale were projected to be biomedical engineers and network and systems and data communications analysts.

 
 
Liar
......lying on your resume is not a good idea....



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