PVAF'S BELIEF IN EDUCATION FOR ALL SOCIAL PROGRESS AND PROSPERITY....PROVED BY CANADA REPORT
Posted by Vishva News Reporter on November 25, 2003

 

CANADA EDUCATION REPORT PROVES
PVAF EDUCATION MANDATE

"Education has traditionally been thought of as one of the drivers of economic growth, contributing to reductions in health-care expenditures and the thing that creates the wealth and allows us to have a vibrant and effective health system," said Scott Murray, director-general of institutions and social statistics at StatsCan.

Prajaapati Vishva Aashram Foundation (PVAF) since its inception in 1996 has had a prime mandate to spread KNOWLEDGE THROUGH EDUCATION among the present humanity on this planet earth...."KNOWLEDGE IS THE ONLY THING THAT WILL ALLEVIATE PAIN AND SUFFERING IN THIS WORLD"...says SRii kRUSH`AN in bhgvD giitaa....

Please read more about this Canada Education Report from the Canadian Globe and Mail by clicking on the next line...and PVAF prays that this will convince YOU more to contribute to the PVAF  GUJRAAT EDUCATION PROGRAM through which with 1 KROR RUPEES A YEAR FUND some 125 financially strapped students can get a 4-year degree to be employed in the current world industries and break out of generations of poverty......  



 

Health funding top education

University costs push private outlays up as more students seek degrees, diplomas

By CAROLINE ALPHONSO
EDUCATION REPORTER
Globe and Mail: Wednesday, November 26, 2003 - Page A9



Health-care funding in Canada has surpassed education spending, causing concern among educators about whether governments are giving less priority to schooling.

Provincial governments spent just under 15 per cent of their total outlays on education in 2001, compared with 17 per cent on health. Until 2000, provinces had always put more money toward education, according to a report released yesterday by Statistics Canada and the Council of Ministers of Education.

Despite this refocusing taking place on the part of provincial governments, Canada ranks first among major industrialized countries in education spending, just ahead of the United States. The territories and smaller provinces allocated a higher percentage of their gross domestic product to education than did larger provinces.

But Paul Cappon, director-general of the Council of Ministers of Education, which represents provincial and territorial education ministers, warned against complacency, especially in light of schools getting less than the health-care sector.

"It's interesting that even people with backgrounds in medicine . . . consider that education is a very strong determinant of health," Dr. Cappon said yesterday.

The wide-ranging report paints a picture of the country's schooling system over the past decade and Canada's place on the international stage.

It projected that the number of five- to 13-year-olds will decline 14 per cent until 2011 because of a recent drop in births. Schools will have to adapt to dropping enrolment while maintaining quality, Dr. Cappon said.

But he noted that a greater participation rate in higher education means the decrease felt in lower grades will not be seen in universities and colleges. Canada is highly ranked among industrialized countries for the number of people with university degrees and college diplomas. Around 41 per cent of the working-age population has college or university credentials, compared with 37 per cent in the United States.

The report showed that while education is receiving proportionately fewer dollars than health, the private sector is contributing an increasing amount, particularly at the postsecondary level.

Dr. Cappon said that private spending on education increased 16 per cent between 1997 and 2001. The majority of this increase was at the university level, as tuition fees rose.

Meanwhile, government spending on education increased 4 per cent over that period.

The authors of the report said that governments should pause and think about their spending priorities.

While demographics have played a role in how money is being distributed, governments have also refocused their priorities, they say.

"Education has traditionally been thought of as one of the drivers of economic growth, [contributing to] reductions in health-care expenditures and the thing that creates the wealth and allows us to have a vibrant and effective health system," said Scott Murray, director-general of institutions and social statistics at StatsCan.

Penny Milton, executive director of the non-profit Canadian Education Association, said in an interview yesterday that "education contributes to the health of the population and we have to be prepared to wait for a return on our investment."

Other findings in the report include:

In 2000, there were on average seven students per computer in a school, compared with the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development average of 31 students to a computer.

The proportion of male educators dropped to 35 per cent in 1999-2000 from 41 in 1989-1990. Also, there are far fewer young male teachers.

Among four- and five-year-olds, 65 per cent of girls' parents encouraged them to write daily, compared with 51 per cent for boys.



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