veD of SPOTTING & NURTURING HUMAN TALENT:.....THERE IS FINE LINE BETWEEN A GENIUS AND A STUPID.....KNOWLEDGE FROM veD MAKES IT EASY TO SPOT AND NURTUR
Posted by Vishva News Reporter on April 17, 2004

IS HUMAN TALENT NURTURABLE?

Somebody says a human has:

  • unlimited talent but
  • the talent has to be spotted and nurtured to be employed to be productive in life

Then again some great wise old educator has said:

  • It is the primary function of a parents and teachers to find the god given talent in a child and
  • nurture it to full blossoming to be employed in being productive in life.....

How does both of the above can be scientifically done in life when social sciences have lagged behind in the current evolution of humankind....the answers are in the texts of SCIENCES OF CREATION AND LIFE. The knowledge of these eternal sciences is given to mankind at the start of every creation cycle of 4.32 billion years called a kl`p of bRHmaa-Din (a day time of grandfather BRHmaa-Daev's life span of 311 trillion 40 billion years)...This veD knowledge tells us that a human can achieve its full potential of talents if the human being travels with the following 3 equations during a life time:

  1. YOU ARE = YOUR LIFE PATH
     
  2. YOUR LIFE PATH = LIFE OF st`y (Truth) and RUtt (following all tenets of DHARm)
     
  3. WHEN YOU ARE ON YOUR PATH = ALL RESOURCES NEEDED TO WALK YOUR PATH COME TO YOU WHEN YOU NEED THEM TO MAKE LIFE FULL OF TALENTED SUCCESSES.   

And you can get the understanding of the above by participating in the study of veD at PVAF by YOUR daily learning on AASHRAM NEWS page, TODAY'S PRAYER page, TODAY'S VED page, VED PAGE and stsNg on MESSAGE BOARD.....If you wish to understand the above 3 equations in YOUR LIFE you can write an email to SRii chmpklaal Daajibhaai misTRii who assists to compile and disseminate veD knowledge on this PVAF web site......and who has shared the above knowledge......  

As part of evolving current social science on human nature, please click on the next line to read Prof. Jeffrey Gandz from the University of Western Ontario's Richard Ivey School of Business, who delivered an amusing talk on the subject recently and as reported by Canadian Globe and Mail.....


THE HUMAN HI-POS AND LO-POS
THE EINSTEINS AND FAKERS

By JUDITH TIMSON
Canadian Globe and Mail: Wednesday, March 24, 2004 - Page C3

In the award-winning play and movie Amadeus, Antonio Salieri, a dignified court composer in 18th-century Austria who turns out perfectly fine and often lovely music, is driven mad by his jealousy of another musician at court, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, who is clearly a genius.

What enrages Salieri most is that the young Mozart, while composing some of the most sublime music ever heard, is shockingly badly behaved, or in the words of one courtier, he is "an unprincipled, spoiled, conceited brat."

Well, that is unfortunately often the case with top talent, especially in its incipient stages. And one of the key challenges of any organization -- not just the court of Austrian Emperor Joseph II -- is how to recognize that talent, nurture it and keep it moving forward, all the while managing its eccentricities. (Not to mention soothing the Salieris left behind.) After decades of brutal economic circumstances in which companies have had to struggle constantly to redefine themselves, it's interesting to consider just how much hard-to-handle behaviour is really tolerated these days.

Quite a bit, according to Prof. Jeffrey Gandz from the University of Western Ontario's Richard Ivey School of Business, who delivered an amusing talk on the subject recently.

While there may have been a time when the emphasis was so firmly on "corporate fit" that companies like IBM would choose the least objectionable (and in some cases least interesting) candidate, now, he says, "it's quite healthy -- people are recognizing talent more than they ever did and companies are going out of their way to find and keep outstanding talent."

Prof. Gandz was speaking in Toronto to a roomful of human resources managers and senior executives from companies featured in the 2004 edition of Canada's Top 100 Employers ( by Richard W. Yerema, published by Mediacorp), so presumably they already know how to snare and retain top leadership talent.

But Prof. Gandz, who is not only the managing director of Ivey's executive development program, but has also worked in leadership development for General Electric -- generally acknowledged to be one of the world's best companies in nurturing talent -- offered an insightful refresher course.

Two things are true of top talent, he said. Top talent requires a different method of care and feeding, and top talent can be, well, a pain in the ass. "Some of them are not nice people." Or, as the professor said, apologizing in advance for his language, "it's hard to tell the difference between a rising star and a flaming asshole."

This doesn't mean you can get away, as young Mozart did for a while, with running through the court or office making poo-poo jokes and laughing uncontrollably. Obviously, says Prof. Gandz, elaborating further during a phone interview, if you're so obnoxious that you're "an organizational sociopath, no one is going to be able to liberate your talent."

So what are the characteristics of moderately well-functioning highly talented people, be they accountants, engineers or any other professionals? The obvious -- drive, focus, passion, intelligence. They want to work in a winning organization and they want to be with other top talent. They need to be constantly challenged -- "they are challenge junkies" says Prof. Gandz -- and they don't want to be part of any ordinary team going through predictable hoops. They want to be individually recognized and rewarded. In other words, "annual performance reviews are not how you manage top talent." (Instead, they need to be reviewed on a project-by-project basis.) Stellar talent and high leadership potentials usually make up only about 15 per cent of any company. They get frustrated very quickly if they are working for executives who sit on their talent and let it waste away, so they need to be placed with "leader-breeders."

A company should use its top talent to identify and hire in quantity other high leadership potentials, or what Prof. Gandz calls hi-pos. And the good news about hi-pos is that despite their insecurities -- they often secretly consider themselves frauds -- they can usually handle "brutally candid feedback," he says. On the other hand, low leadership potential employees, or lo-pos as Prof. Gandz calls them, are generally more defensive about criticism.

A good company must know how to smoothly manage the hi-pos and the lo-pos, especially so that the lo-pos don't become one of the so-called po-pos "passed over and pissed off about it.") It is the difficult task of every good company to identify its talent and then create and manage what Prof. Gandz calls "inequalities but not inequities" -- you give the top talent a gigantic bonus but "that is where candour comes in" when you deal with the lesser lights. "It's terribly important for people who aren't hi-pos to be treated and managed well," Prof. Gandz says.

Yet we are all masters of self-deception, so the tricky part is coming to terms with whether one really is a hi-po. Some people take themselves out of the action, acknowledging they don't have either the talent or the drive to do what it takes.

In Amadeus, Salieri freely acknowledges that he is mediocre. Some would say that is the very definition of a midlife crisis -- realizing you're good but not great at what you do. Mediocrity doesn't have to be negative, says Prof. Gandz, it's simply "in the middle."

A wonderful scene in the movie depicts the finally completely broken-down Salieri, the "patron saint of mediocrity," being wheeled through an insane asylum bellowing "mediocrities everywhere, I absolve you." (Meanwhile, it's also worth noting that Mozart didn't fare so well either -- he died young, penniless and banished from at least one court.)

I asked Prof. Gandz just how good he is at spotting high potential leadership talent in his classroom. "I'm pretty good at picking out the potential," he said, "but how it turns out in the long run? Well there are lots of mistakes made."

Prof. Gandz, who perhaps too modestly describes himself as a "journeyman researcher," says "there's a little bit of Salieri in most academics." But of course we absolve them, especially if they are as amusing as Prof. Gandz.

jtimson@globeandmail.ca

 



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