veD OF HUMAN MAKING:......WHO MAKES EACH HUMAN BEING?....YOU HAVE DESIGNED YOUR BODY TO EXPERIENCE THE FRUITS OF YOUR PAST kARm......
Posted by Champaklal Dajibhai Mistry on April 18, 2004

WHO MAKES YOU BODY?
YOUR PARENTS OR YOU? OR YOUR GOD?

aayuARveD and puraaANo such as bhaagvt puraaAN, sKND puraaAN describe the acquiring of a human body or any living body by an aat`maa (soul) as it travels in the eternal cylce of birth and death called sNsaar in this creation called the world that is perceptible and sensible to living beings...This knowledge of SCIENCES OF CREATION AND LIFE is called veD in sNskRUt language.....

An aat`maa (soul) has to acquire a body to be manifested as a living being and perform all the kARm or actions it can or wishes to perform. And that physical body is designed and made by the aat`maa itself to experience the kARm-fl (fruits or results of kARm) that aat`maa has banked in the previous lives as a living being of various ruup (forms) and naam.....This means that YOU as an aat`maa:

  •  YOU HAVE DESIGNED YOUR OWN BODY IN THIS LIFE TIME......
     
  • AND YOU WILL DESIGN THE FUTURE BODIES YOU WILL ACQUIRE.....
     
  • YOU WILL DESIGN YOUR OWN BODY EACH LIFE TIME TO EXPERIENCE THE kARm-fl THAT YOU HAVE TO EXPERIENCE SOMETIME IN YOUR TRAVELS WITH VARIOUS TYPES OF BODIES....
     
  • THE EXPERIENCE OF THE kARm-fl FROM THE kARm OF YOUR PREVIOUS LIVES FRUCTIFIES AS PER THE GRAND SCHEME AND PLAN OF CREATION BY YOUR CREATOR bRH`m..
     
  • THE EXTENT OF FRUCTIFICATION OF YOUR kARm-fl IS DRAWN FROM THE 3 BANKS WHERE THE kARm-fl ARE STORED ETERNALLY....
     
  • YOUR 3 kARm-fl BANKS ARE: 1: aagm,   2: sNchit`t and 3:  pRARbh`daa

YOU can visit the various veD pages on this PVAF web site to understand to an extent all of the above TRUTH as the above is the knowledge from veD and veD CAN NEVER BE UNTRUE......or write to chmpklaal Daajibhaai misTRii to participate in the veD study continually going on at PVAF or to ask for discussion on the above subject matter.....

Since the discovery of DNA the sciences of genetics is on a fast track to find out how bodies of living beings including humans are made and how they function...But current medical sciences know only about one percent of a human body and then again this knowledge is fragmented as all parts of any human body work in a consortium and not on an stand-alone individual basis...But the current medical science has ignored the aspect of aat`maa totally since Rene Descartes said some 500 years ago on the even of discovery of current science that "all things in creations are mechanical bodies"...... 

Please click on the next line to read an interesting medical research being done and known as DNA EPIGENETICS: WHY IDENTICAL TWINS STOP BEING IDENTICAL....BECAUSE DNA EPIGENETICS HAS KICKED IN...  as reported by Canadian Globe and Mail....or you can read it directly by visiting the newspaper web site....



Why identical twins stop being identical:
Because DNA 'epigenetics' has kicked in.

By PAUL TAYLOR
Canadian Globe and Mail: Saturday, March 20, 2004 - Page F9

As children, Malcolm and Michael Lee liked to see if people could tell them apart. In Grade 9, the identical twins from Maple Ridge, B.C., switched classes one day, "and no one knew it," Malcolm recalls.

But at the age of 19, their lives took dramatically different paths. Malcolm was stricken with schizophrenia and suffered from hallucinations and delusions. He was certain he could hear Princess Diana and John Kennedy talking to him. He spent much of the next two decades in mental institutions and group homes.

Michael, by contrast, was completely unaffected by the mental disorder. He went to university, became a computer programmer, got married and had a family.

Medical researchers have long been baffled by such cases. How could two people who inherit virtually identical genes and grow up together turn out so different? Neither conventional genetics nor environmental influences seem to offer a convincing explanation.

But now an emerging field of research known as epigenetics may solve the riddle of schizophrenia and shed light on other complex inherited disorders, including manic depression, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and some cancers. It may even explain how personality is shaped in early infancy.

Epigenetics is the study of gene regulation -- or what turns genes on and off. Researchers speculate that twins can be born with the same DNA, but undergo subtle changes in which different genes are activated, giving rise to different medical conditions.

Dr. Arturas Petronis heads a research team at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health in Toronto studying genetic snippets of schizophrenics and non-schizophrenics. "If we can understand schizophrenia . . . then we should also be able to understand other complex diseases," he says, noting that his researchers have already discovered "significant" differences between the two groups.

Epigenetic factors can alter the activity of genes in a variety of ways without fundamentally changing the genes themselves. One process is methylation: Specific molecules, know as methyl groups, made up of one carbon and three hydrogen atoms, attach themselves to various genes and act like keys in locks, shutting down some of them.

Researchers are now investigating the possibility that an accumulation of tiny mistakes during epigenetic regulation could set the stage for a disease. Rather than being caused by a major mutation in the DNA sequence, a disease may arise because genes remain active or inactive when they shouldn't.

"We are not saying that DNA sequence variation is totally irrelevant to complex diseases," said Dr. Petronis. "There are some clear examples, such as certain breast cancers, where this is the case. But there are many other conditions in which epigenetic misregulation seems to fit the story very well."

It's unlikely that entire genes would be actually shut off. Instead, their activity may simply be adjusted up or down -- just enough to trigger a disease.

The first major overhaul of epigenetic factors occurs at the time of conception. When the egg and sperm meet to form an embryo, each has a different pattern of methylated genes. The old methyl groups are stripped away and then reform on specific genes as new cells develop in the rapidly growing fetus. Some of the patterns appear to be passed down from the mother, and others from the father, in a process called parental imprinting.

Researchers don't yet understand how this complex process works, said Dr. Judith Hall, a professor of pediatrics and medical genetics at the University of British Columbia. But current evidence suggests that a mother's diet can influence at least some of the epigenetic patterns being established in the developing fetus.

For instance, researchers have long known that women whose diets are deficient in the nutrient folic acid are at much greater risk of giving birth to children with defects such as spina bifida. However, they weren't sure why. Now they believe that folic acid, which is added to flour and other grains in Canada, provides the raw ingredients for building methyl groups and thereby assists in normal fetal development, Dr. Hall said.

Some researchers are also asking whether the apparent prevalence of some birth defects in "test-tube babies" may result from a disruption in normal epigenetic formation. A few studies have suggested there is a slightly elevated rate of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, which causes growth abnormalities, among children created through in-vitro fertilization.

Mixing the egg and the sperm in a petri dish, rather than in a woman's body, could represent "an environmental change that may alter methylation," said Rosanna Weksberg, head of clinical and metabolic genetics at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, who is trying to co-ordinate a study to examine the risk.

Epigenetic changes continue to take place once a child is born and may be influenced by child-rearing practices. Michael Meaney, a professor of medicine at McGill University, has been exploring this by observing how lab rats treat their young, and has discovered that infant rats given the best maternal care are most likely to respond calmly to stress later in life.

Dr. Meaney says attentive mother rats tend to lick and groom their babies a lot, which stimulates specific developments in the baby's brains and turns on genes that can curb stress hormones. So when a stressful situation arises, these rats react in a "chilled-out" fashion.

Some epigenetic patterns shaped by childhood experiences have a lasting effect, but further changes seem to take place at various stages of growth and development. Adolescence, for instance, is marked by a major flux in hormones, which could set off another swing in epigenetic signals. Several diseases, including schizophrenia, tend to arise at this time.

Schizophrenics tend to suffer from fewer symptoms as they get older. Malcolm Lee, for example, is now 41, and his auditory hallucinations have almost completely disappeared. He's on new medication -- which may be a factor in his improvement -- working part-time and attending night school.

Researchers still have a big job ahead in determining precisely what made him and his brother so different. But once they identify which signals may be causing which diseases, they can start looking for ways to fix the problems.

Paul Taylor is a Globe and Mail assistant national editor, responsible for health and science coverage.






 



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