YOUTH PAGE:.....GUIDE TO BEING A SUCCESSFUL PROFESSIONAL ADULT.....FOR YOUTH, ADULTS & THOSE WHO WERE ONCE YOUTH AND ADULTS....
Posted by Ashram News Reporter on May 14, 2004

"How did you come to do what you do?...
And so successfully...."

"Choosing what we do for a living -- or having it choose us -- is, as American author Po Bronson observed in his bestseller What Should I Do With My Life? "one of life's great dramas." There's usually a Greek chorus (the parental unit), an unexpected twist in the road (can't get into medical school) and a crisis or two to be overcome.

For some there is unbelievable success -- think of the founders of Google, so young and yet so rich, for others, a life of desperately unsatisfying activity, and for most everyone else , something in between -- good years and bad, fulfillment and drudgery."

To continue enlightening YOURSELF whether you are a youth, young adult or one who was youth and young adult one time please visit the web site Canadian Globe and Mail  ....or click on the next line to enlighten YOURSELF on this EVER ENLIGHTENING PVAF WEB SITE.....



It's not what you do,...
it's how you got there

By JUDITH TIMSON
Canadian Globe and Mail :Wednesday, May 5, 2004 - Page C3

In Toronto, the careerist capital of Canada, when strangers meet, they don't say "How do you do?" They say "What do you do?"

It is a question that drives many people crazy because they don't wish to be defined by or awarded status or demerit points on the basis of their work.

I say it's all right to ask the question if you follow it up with a much more interesting second question: "How did you come to do what you do?"

It is then, not in the simple job description, that character is revealed and destiny described. The real estate saleswoman confesses she wanted to be a forensic pathologist but was not steered to the right university courses. The lawyer shrugs and says he had no clue what he wanted to do and law school seemed like a good idea at the time. The entrepreneur admits he had this crazy idea about starting a small radio station. The highly capable nurse still laments her family did not have the money to send her to university.

Choosing what we do for a living -- or having it choose us -- is, as American author Po Bronson observed in his bestseller What Should I Do With My Life? "one of life's great dramas." There's usually a Greek chorus (the parental unit), an unexpected twist in the road (can't get into medical school) and a crisis or two to be overcome.

For some there is unbelievable success -- think of the founders of Google, so young and yet so rich, for others, a life of desperately unsatisfying activity, and for most everyone else , something in between -- good years and bad, fulfilment and drudgery.


If you ask people about their professional regrets, they usually involve something they didn't do, as opposed to something they did. "I didn't try out enough things when I was young," says one businessman.

Sometimes I think people invest their careers with the same mythology they do their love lives -- the great passion, the career that got away, now looms larger than life. Which is why, in their fifties, many people go looking for that career spark they left behind. And which is why the word "passion" is today popping up in more and more career consultants' marketing come-ons.

We understand, because of our own convoluted life circumstances, that there is no one moment when we fall in love with our work and stay that way, but we don't demystify the process enough for students .

It starts early in schools. "When they have a career day at my daughter's school, they usually haul in the parents and that's a narrow spectrum -- a handful of doctors and lawyers," says one Montreal woman who wanted to be an architect but ended up with a Bachelor of Commerce degree. On the other hand it's difficult to convey how vast the possibilities are without overwhelming students.

Because of changing work patterns, we now get it that when you choose a career, it most likely won't end up being exactly that job or even that career for life. But how helpful is it to tell someone starting out, actually agonizing over the choices, not to worry because that job won't be around anyway 20 years from now?

The graduates in good shape are the ones who emerge even hungrier to learn. That's what a great education should really foster: a big appetite for learning, and just a little bit of bravery.

A few years ago, a high school student in the neighbourhood was doing a project on careers, and she called with a good question: "What did you want to be at 16, and what are you today?" I warned her my answer would be boring -- in short, I became what I wanted to be. "Out of 16 people, you and only one other person answered this way," she said.

It's not surprising that we don't all become what we think we want to be. If we did, it would be a pretty dull world.

In the meantime, on the bumpy road to getting there, there's always humour. A teenager I know -- tired of adults asking her all the time what she wanted to be -- decided at a recent family party to just mutter the words "brain surgeon" to any adult in the room.

I thought it was a great idea until, at the same party, I came upon a guest who actually is a brain surgeon and he laughed when I told him her plan. "I went skiing recently, and on the chairlift someone asked me what I did. When I said neurosurgeon, he wouldn't believe me."

What kind of a world is it if you can't get instant status points for being a brain surgeon? I guess it's a world in which you might as well do exactly what you want.


 



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