veD OF EDUCATION:....TRUTH ABOUT EDUCATION AS STATED IN bhgvD giitaa VERIFIED BY CANADIAN STUDY....SO NOW YOU CAN DONATE TO PVAF GEP.......
Posted by Ashram News Reporter on January 21, 2005

CANADIAN STUDY SHOWS
HOW
EDUCATION PERPETUATES EDUCATION IN FAMILIES:

  • Participation in education by children of a parent is strongly influenced by the education level of parents;
     
  • If a child's parents went to university or college, there is a strong likelihood that the child will also go on to post-secondary education;
     
  • If  a child is doing well in high school, then there's a very good chance that the child will go to college or university;
     
  • Parental education is much more important than how much money a family has. Education seems to transmit a will to go...and once that is transmitted, the money matters less;

The above proves than GNaan = KNOWLEDGE is always eternal or never dies...all other human possessions will perish sooner or later...as stated in bhgvD giitaa....

REMOVAL OF POVERTY THROUGH EDUCATION
IS HAPPENING IN THE
GUJRAAT EDUCATION PROGRAM (GEP)
OF
PRAJAAPTI VISVA AASHRAM FOUNDATION (PVAF)


IN JANUARY 2005
PVAF IS PROCESSING 10 APPLICATIONS
FROM VERY POOR STUDENTS IN GUJRAAT


DONATE A CHILD TO GO TO UNIVERSITY IN GUJRAAT, INDIA...

YOUR DONATION OF
 Rs 20,000 A YEAR
(ABOUT CAN$600)
FOR 4 YEARS
 IS AN ETERNALLY RETURNING INVESTMENT
 WITH HIGHEST RETURN IN THIS WORLD

AN ENTIRE POOR FAMILY GETS UPLIFTED
AND THAT IS WHY PVAF GEP IS PROVIDING
FUNDS TO EDUCATE  THE ENTIRE FAMILY INCLUDING PARENTS


For how YOU can donate please email:
 PVAF GEP DONATION

EDUCATION is the whole purpose of  the birth, growth and existence of PVAF and this PVAF purpose will survive through eternity....

Please click on the next line to learn how PVAF's purpose and PVAF GEP is verified as TRUTH by a Canadian study........



University grads beget university students

By ALLISON DUNFIELD
Canadian The Globe and Mail

If a child's parents went to university or college, there is a strong likelihood that the child will also go on to postsecondary education, a new Statistics Canada report says.

Participation in university, especially, is "strongly influenced by the education level of parents and other family background characteristics," the report, examining the effects of parents' higher education on their children's postsecondary participation, said.

Ross Finnie, a professor at the school of policy studies at Queen's University in Kingston, Ont., and one of the report's authors, said the study showed both a direct link to whether a child's parents went to university and their own experience, as well as an indirect link.
"The second part of it is, a lot of that influence is through high school outcomes [ie. grades] and attitudes and the other, early influences that determine whether or not individuals go on to post-secondary," he said Tuesday upon release of the report.

"If someone's doing well in high school, then there's a very good chance...they're going to go on to university," Prof. Finnie said.

Thus, the study has a policy implication because these factors emerge early, he said--while a student is still in school. If policy makers want to change the postsecondary outcome in Canada, they must go after the problem earlier, he said.

One of the more surprising factors was that income level seems to be less of a determining factor in whether a child goes on to university than whether his or her parents went to university, although that was not the main focus of the report.

"Parental education is much more important than how much money your family has. Education seems to transmit a will to go...and once that is transmitted, the money matters less," Prof. Finnie said.

The study cites a number of other recent reports, including one that found "inherited intellectual capital," has a strong effect on children.

There are several examples of children being strongly influenced by their parents' postsecondary attendance in the study.

Each additional year that parents took some form of postsecondary education increased the likelihood of university attendance by as much as five percentage points, the report found.

And fathers' education seems to have a much greater effect on sons than on daughters. Prof. Finnie said that the explanation is likely to do with "some sort of role-modelling, sex specific influence going on which is kind of interesting."

By sex, the study found, the university attendance rates for those whose parents have a high school diploma are 29 per cent for men and 37 per cent for women.

Those percentages increased for children whose parents went on to university, the study found. Fifty-three per cent of men went on to post-secondary education, as compared with 65 per cent of women.

The Statscan report also looked at the type of family a child came from and how that influenced their education.

The authors found that those from two-parent families were approximately 25 per cent more likely to attend some form of higher education than those from single-mother families.

By ethnicity, the survey found Asian men were by far the most likely to enter further education after high school. They are 23 per cent more likely to take any sort of postsecondary education. On the other end of the spectrum, the study found that Native Canadians have very low participation rates. Prof. Finnie said part of this is related to parental influence, because for the most part they do not have parents who went on to university. But it's also related to indirect factors, such as the fact that many Native Canadians live in rural areas.

By region, the authors found rural Canadians were less likely to go to university than urban Canadians, although that wasn't the case for college.

The study used data from two studies, Statistics Canada's 1991 and 1995 School Leavers Surveys, which gathers information from students on their educational intentions upon completing high school and again in their early 20s.



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